Grace brings us face-to-face with aging as she relates her experiences, her memories, advice for surviving the aging process...with Grace. This is a place for humor, sharing, and learning as well as what I hope are some entertaining meanderings of my thoughts.

I hope you also enjoy my book reviews, product reviews and giveaways! Click on the tabs to find out more. Hint: We are always looking for more books and products for review.

I thank you for clicking on the advertisements shown on my pages - but only if you are truly interested in the product(s). These are affiliate accounts and I do receive compensation when the ads are clicked. If you aren't interested, please do not feel obligated.

Thank you for visiting ~ please come back often & don't forget to follow us here! Our follower friends are our special treasures!

Wednesday, April 4, 2012

More women in their 60s living with their friends

Today I'd like to share with you an article I found most interesting.  The concept is catching on and I believe we will be hearing more about this in the coming years.  Hugs, GraceinAZ


Some say the ‘60s hippies are going back to the commune. Others call the growing number of female baby boomers rooming together “‘The Golden Girls’ phenomenon.”
Author_martha_nelsonIt’s really about women choosing to live with friends, Martha Nelson, author of “Black Chokeberry,” novel about three older women who unexpectedly end up sharing a home, said in a statement.
“As a group, we’ve been empowered more than past generations of women,” said Nelson. “We’re more worldly, stronger, financially savvy, and healthier than our ancestors… and we know what we want.”
Increasingly, what women want is to actively age with the camaraderie, laughter, understanding, and support of other women who share their ideas of healthy lifestyles, good food from their own gardens, green living, and other activities.
In 2010, 480,000 boomer women lived with a least one unrelated female, according to an AARP analysis.
And, the number of U.S. HomeShare programs, which help connect people interested in sharing a house, has been steadily rising since the Great Recession.
“This concept is really trending on the East and West coasts and is very big in Europe,” said Ryan Cowmeadow, vice president of the National Shared Housing Resource Center, a clearinghouse of HomeShare programs.
HomeShare’s numbers are up about 15 percent since 2007, and about 75 percent of applicants are female.
The cohousing movement – where residents have private living spaces but share common areas, such as dining rooms, and tasks, such as cooking – started in Denmark and is becoming popular in the United States.
Cohousing can be found in more than 200 communities in America, with the states of California, Colorado, Massachusetts, North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania, and Washington offering the most cohousing opportunities.
Nelson said more women are interested in living with other women because women usually live longer than men, and men are more likely to remarry after a divorce or the death of a spouse.
“And fundamentally, I think it’s as much about the special bonds women share,” she said. “We form these wonderful, supportive, 'tell the truth' friendships, which survive the demands of husbands, children, and careers.”
A former journalist and educator, Nelson’s marriage ended in divorce when she was in her 50s. After regaining her balance as a single woman, she turned to her friends as she stepped back into life.
"I came to fully understand the importance of women friends in my life," she said. "They are the gold standard and as we age, they are critical to happiness, regardless if one is married or in a committed relationship."
The practical considerations of creating close living communities – include health and safety, care in times of an accident or medical emergency, and financial considerations – are important for many women who find themselves single or widowed after long marriages, Nelson said.
But boomers are known for demanding more than creature comforts from life, she said. “We want to be happy; we’re healthy, active and we want to enjoy ourselves as we age. We want to travel, go to a movie with a neighbor or housemate, cook a meal, share a garden, and feel that we are contributing to our communities.
“We’re strong women, and we can choose to live the way we want as we get older,” Nelson said. “Very often, that will mean with other women in close knit communities."


This article appeared on The Survive and Thrive Boomer Guide, a blog written by consumer journalist Rita R. Robison.  It appears here with permission from the author.

created by made it for you

10 comments:

  1. Grace, I could go for this but so far have not found any other women that would want to do it that own a home. I live in an apartment. I think it is a great idea, especially for those of us without families. Thank you for sharing the story.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ann - I agree, I believe I could do this, too, if I were single. It is a good idea and would save money in many ways.
      Hugs, GraceinAZ

      Delete
  2. Home sharing makes perfect sense. It's often the cost of maintenance that forces a woman out of her home and sharing space allows funds for hiring help. Having the company and support of like minded friends can make this stage of life very rewarding! ~ Maureen

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Maureen - It would also save on the cost of home health care if they were to share. It just makes so much sense.
      Hugs, GraceinAZ

      Delete
  3. I have often thought that there are few of my friends that I could live with..that we would get along and our lives would mesh almost seamlessly. It makes such good sense if one is single, doesn't it? Great article, Grace! xo Diana

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Diana - It is a wonderful idea who's time has come!
      Hugs, GraceinAZ

      Delete
  4. Even though I am on in my late 30s and my best friend is in her mid 40s, we talk about the future and how we will be living together and traveling together in our old age. :) I love this idea. I need to tell my grandmother about it. She is quite lonely in her basement suite. This would be good for her.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Michelle - Great that you are already planning for your years to come! And, I hope your Grandmother is open to this idea. It isn't so good to be alone.
      Hugs, GraceinAZ

      Delete
  5. I didn't see this earlier. I hope you don't mind if I add a link to this post on the "POP UP" article. It is a great article.

    b

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Barbara - of course you may! I found it very interesting!
      Hugs, GraceinAZ

      Delete

Your comments are like hugs that warm my heart!

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...